Innovation Mindset

Author: Annette Brown 

Originally published at OfficeDynamics.com.

innovation mindset

Full disclosure—I’m a recovering perfectionist. Nicknames that have followed me over the course of my lifetime include “Miss Goody-Two-shoes,” “Little Miss Perfect” and “Rule Girl.” I’d like to think I always try to do the right thing. I have to admit, I’m one of those people who has historically loved being right. But I’ve found this hasn’t necessarily been the best mindset for innovation. And having an innovation mindset is more important than ever—a McKinsey study showed 70% of senior leaders think it’s the most critical factor for success.

Leaders say they need “creative problem-solving” from their people, and that’s definitely important. But I’ve learned a valuable, life-changing lesson from a wise, long-time friend and colleague, the late Jerry McNellis, who would say, “In business, mostly what we talk about is problem-solving, but in reality, what we have most of the time are predicaments. Problems have answers, predicaments have options.” Over time, what I’ve realized is there are a lot of “rights.” We waste a lot of time looking for the right answer when perhaps what we should be doing is exploring options. So I’ve been working on getting past the need to be right and, instead, focus on getting better at staying open-minded and asking great questions.

Read moreInnovation Mindset

Getting Approved for Training

We recently received a request for Joan to write an assistant with some tips on persuading her executive to invest in her attendance at the 2016 Annual Conference for Administrative Excellence. We found that many of you may actually want to access these tips as well as we’re often asked for tips on getting approved for training. We’re posting Joan’s message here for that purpose.

Persuading-your-boss-to-send-you-to-conference

Thank you for your interest in our conference. We have an excellent theme for 2016, The Revolutionary Assistant.

You were asking about what you could share with your executive to talk about cost associated with conference.

My first word of advice is to not use the word “cost.” Immediately that can send a negative to an executive. Instead you want to use the word “investment” because that is what your company is doing. They are investing in education for you that they will get back from your learning and executing the good ideas you learn at our conference.

Read moreGetting Approved for Training